Faculty & Staff

Tracking the Atlanta Streetcar in real time

The Atlanta Streetcar near the original Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta. Georgia Tech researchers have developed a way to improve the timing of the streetcar, eliminating the need for schedules and reducing passenger wait time. (Photo: Spmarshall42 / Wikimedia Commons)

Starting this summer, the Atlanta Streetcar will begin using a new real-time dispatching method developed at Georgia Tech that eliminates the need for schedules and cuts down on passenger wait times.

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Haitian Roundtable recognizes DesRoches as one of 2016's change-making Haitian-Americans

The Haitian Roundtable's 2016 1804 List of Changemakers and Ones to Watch.

A group of Haitian-American professionals has recognized Reginald DesRoches as one of the country’s outstanding leaders making an impact in their field and on their island homeland. The Haitian Roundtable released its 1804 List May 18, including DesRoches as one of 25 “changemakers.”

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

A Booming Career

Assistant Professor Lauren Stewart in her lab.

Walking toward Lauren Stewart’s office, you immediately smell the odor of glue in the air. A quick glance around reveals model bridges in various states of completion lying about a student work area as harried undergraduates work to finish class assignments. Stewart, an assistant professor in civil and environmental engineering, teaches a beginning structures course, so this is a recurrent theme each semester. Stewart herself, however, is more at home with the smell of explosives and destruction rather than construction.

Monday, April 11, 2016

Arson earns tenure, promotion to associate professor

Chloe Arson

Chloe Arson becomes an associate professor with tenure, effective August 15. Georgia Tech President G.P. “Bud” Peterson recommended the promotion and awarding Arson tenure a few weeks ago.

Tuesday, April 5, 2016

Air Force selects Stewart for summer faculty fellowship program

Lauren Stewart in her lab. (Photo: Gary Meek)

Lauren Stewart will spend some of her summer at Eglin Air Force Base in Ft. Walton Beach, Florida, working to better understand how military components react when they strike a “hardened target.” Stewart has received a summer faculty fellowship from the Air Force Research Lab.

Friday, March 25, 2016

Bacteria in the pipes: Study identifies the hard-to-detect microbes in hospital shower hoses

Growth of Mycobacterium isolated on a plate of culture medium. (Photo: Stacey Pfaller, EPA)

The human microbiome, a diverse collection of microorganisms living inside us and on our skin, has attracted considerable attention for its role in a broad range of human health issues. Now, researchers are discovering that the built environment also has a microbiome, which includes a community of potentially-pathogenic bacteria living inside water supply pipes. A paper published March 11 in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology describes microbial communities found in shower hoses at a major U.S. hospital. The study documented bacteria – and related genes – using cutting-edge metagenomic techniques that allow the characterization of organisms that cannot be detected using traditional culture-based microbiology assays.

Monday, March 14, 2016

Simon wins Tech’s top award for graduate academic advising

CEE Graduate Programs Manager Robert Simon

Robert Simon’s work with School of Civil and Environmental Engineering graduate students has earned him one of Georgia Tech’s top awards. Simon is the 2016 recipient of the Outstanding Graduate Academic Advising Award. The awards committee noted his dedication to supporting students and enriching their educational experience on campus.

Friday, March 11, 2016

Meet the new Higginbotham Professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering: David Frost

Elizabeth and Bill Higginbotham Professor David Frost

Professor David Frost has been named the Elizabeth and Bill Higginbotham Professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. School Chair Reginald DesRoches made the appointment after the Higginbotham family created the new professorship earlier this year.

Friday, March 4, 2016

Paulino’s origami research wins award for scientific excellence, originality

Glaucio Paulino and Evgueni Filipov with models of their zippered tube origami configuration. (Photo: Rob Felt)

A paper detailing a type of origami tube that is strong and reconfigurable will be recognized in May as one of the best studies published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in 2015. The editors of the journal have selected the research for the Cozzarelli Prize, an annual award for scientific excellence and originality.

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Less sulfate in the air, but it’s still as acidic as ever

Hongyu Guo, Rodney Weber and Ted Russell on their research platform atop the Ford Environmental Science & Technology Building.

Acidic sulfur emissions from power plants have been rapidly declining over the past decade, and the neutralizing base – ammonia – is emitted from a different source, and has not declined. This has led many atmospheric scientists to assume that the ambient sulfate particles we all breathe are becoming less acidic and therefore less toxic. But a new study shows this intuitive expectation hasn’t happened, at least not in the Southeast United States, where the remaining sulfate particles appear to be as acidic as ever.

Monday, February 22, 2016

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