Faculty & Staff

Yellow Jacket loyalty: 5 questions with student-turned-professor Sheng Dai

Assistant Professor Sheng Dai in his lab.

Sheng Dai arrived in Atlanta just a week before classes began for the fall 2015 semester, and it was really a homecoming of sorts. Dai is the newest faculty member in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, arriving after two years at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory. But before that, he spent half a decade in the School, earning his doctorate in civil engineering. He finished in 2013.

Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Fritz leads survey team to examine dam breaks after South Carolina flooding

A team of scientists led by the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering’s Hermann Fritz has just returned from a four-day reconnaissance mission in South Carolina assessing damage after record-breaking rainfall flooded large swaths of the state. They found several of the dams they inspected failed before they were overtopped by water.

Friday, October 16, 2015

Arson among select educators invited to Frontiers of Engineering Education Symposium

Later this month, some of the brightest young minds in engineering gather in Irvine, California, to talk about the best new approaches to engineering education. The School of Civil and Environmental Engineering’s Chloe Arson is among the select group of early career faculty members invited to the Frontiers of Engineering Education meeting.

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Sustainability and creating wealth: Amekudzi-Kennedy speaks at first EPA youth symposium

Adjo Amekudzi-Kennedy influences students in her Georgia Tech classes every day when it comes to sustainability and development in the developing world. She took that even further Oct. 2 as one of the main speakers at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s first-ever International Youth Environmental Symposium in Atlanta.

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Brown joins world leaders in science and technology at STS forum

Joe Brown is headed to Japan Oct. 4 at the invitation of a select group of leaders in science and technology. He’s joining a small handful of “young leaders” from the United States at the STS forum 2015, a gathering of scholars, policy makers, and business leaders to talk about, as organizers put it, “the new types of problems stemming from the application of science and technology” in our society.

Friday, October 2, 2015

Tien invited to Arab-American Frontiers Symposium on sensing technology and applications

Some of the world’s brightest scholars gather in Saudi Arabia in December to talk about the latest advances in sensing technologies and networks. The School of Civil and Environmental Engineering’s Iris Tien has been invited to join them.

Thursday, October 1, 2015

The real deal: Bill Daniel and Jon Drysdale bring their day jobs into the classroom

Bill Daniel and Jon Drysdale have been tag-teaming the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering’s Geomatics course for nearly two decades, bringing a healthy dose of reality and years of experiences won during careers that have literally spanned the globe. Yet many people in the School have never seen or met the two men.

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Tien wins NSF funding to improve reliability of our interdependent infrastructure

The National Science Foundation has awarded Iris Tien $499,920 for a three-year project that will develop new computer models of infrastructure systems and the connections between them. The idea is to create a model that can be used for any infrastructure system — water, power, transportation, or communications, for example — and takes into account each component of the system as well as how the system interacts with other infrastructure.

Thursday, September 17, 2015

AUDIO: Arson talks fracking in Georgia on WABE

The School of Civil and Environmental Engineering’s Chloe Arson appeared on WABE’s Closer Look September 9 to help explore the risks and rewards of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in Georgia.

Thursday, September 10, 2015

Researchers develop new 'zippered' origami tubes that fold flat, deploy easily, and still hold considerable weight

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of Tokyo have developed a new “zippered tube” configuration that makes paper structures stiff enough to hold weight yet able to fold flat for easy shipping and storage. Their method could be applied to other thin materials, such as plastic or metal, to transform structures ranging from furniture and buildings to microscopic robots.

Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Pages

Subscribe to Faculty & Staff